<em>Damyeni</em>, 2015

Damyeni, 2015

Silicone on wood
22 x 27 x 3 in / 55.9 x 68.6 x 7.6 cm

Damyeni is mesh rectangle that renders the word 'Imagine' in six languages. The title Damyeni is the Hebrew point of entry addressed to a woman. 

Transliteration and Denotations:
Arabic – Tu-kha-eelu, also means “to visualize”
English – Imagine, often brings to mind John Lennon's song
Hindi – Kalpanā, also a common name for women, means imagination and creativity
Hebrew – Dam-ye-ni, “imagine” addressed to a woman
Japanese – Sōzō, a word that describes imagination and creation
Portuguese – Imaginar, directly translated as “to imagine”

Typefaces:
Arabic: TheSans Arabic by Lucas de Groot
English: Union by Radim Pesko
Hindi: Ek Mukta by Girish Delvi
Hebrew: Gufanit by Yael Kanarek
Japanese: Heisei Kaku Gothic by Japanese Standards Association
Portuguese: Gill Sans by Eric Gill

<em>Imagine Horizon</em>, 2014

Imagine Horizon, 2014

Silicone on wood
240 x 33 in / 609.6 x 83.82 cm
Corporate commission

Imagine Horizon is a 20-foot mesh rectangle that uses the concept 'Imagine' in six languages. 

Transliteration and Denotations:
Arabic – Tu-kha-eelu, also means “to visualize”
English – Imagine, often brings to mind John Lennon's song.
Hindi – Kalpanā, also a common name for women, means imagination and creativity
Hebrew – Dam-ye-ni, a female gendered word meaning “imagine”
Japanese – Sōzō, a word that describes imagination and creation
Portuguese – Imaginar, directly translated as “to imagine”

Typefaces:
Arabic: The Sans Arabic by Lucas de Groot
English: Union by Radim Pesko
Hindi: Ek Mukta by Girish Delvi
Hebrew: Gufanit by Yael Kanarek
Japanese: Heisei Kaku Gothic by Japanese Standards Association
Portuguese: Gill Sans by Eric Gill

<em>Imagine Horizon</em>, 2014 (installation view)

Imagine Horizon, 2014 (installation view)

Wood, silicone words in six languages: Arabic, English, Hindi, Hebrew, Japanese, Portuguese
33 x 240 in / 83.8 x 609.6 cm
Corporate commission

Imagine Horizon is a 20-foot mesh rectangle that uses the word 'Imagine' in six languages. 

Transliteration and Denotations:
Arabic – Tu-kha-eelu, also means “to visualize”
English – Imagine, often brings to mind John Lennon's song.
Hindi – Kalpanā, also a common name for women, means imagination and creativity
Hebrew – Dam-ye-ni, a female gendered word meaning “imagine”
Japanese – Sōzō, a word that describes imagination and creation
Portuguese – Imaginar, directly translated as “to imagine”

Typefaces:
Arabic: TheSans Arabic by Lucas de Groot
English: Union by Radim Pesko
Hindi: Ek Mukta by Girish Delvi
Hebrew: Gufanit by Yael Kanarek
Japanese: Heisei Kaku Gothic by Japanese Standards Association
Portuguese: Gill Sans by Eric Gill

<em>White Between the "Green Blouse" and Sneakers</em>, 2011

White Between the "Green Blouse" and Sneakers, 2011

Silicone on wood
The word “white” in nine languages: Amharic, Arabic, English, German, Hebrew, Japanese, Chinese, Latin, Russian
diameter 42 in / 106.7 cm, depth 2 in / 5.1 cm

This work uses a mix of two color palettes: that of recent sneaker design trends and that of the painting The Green Blouse (1919) by Pierre Bonnard. 

Transliterations:
Amharic — Holi
Arabic — Abiad
English — White
German — Weiss
Hebrew — Lavan
Chinese — Bái
Japanese — Shiro
Latin — Niveus
Russian — Bhehley

<em>White Between the "Green Blouse" and Sneakers</em>, 2011

White Between the "Green Blouse" and Sneakers, 2011

Detail 

<em>Sanctify Thyself</em>, 2013

Sanctify Thyself, 2013

Silicone on wood
The word “white” in nine languages: Amharic, Arabic, English, German, Hebrew, Japanese, Chinese, Latin, Russian
diameter 42 in / 106.7 cm, depth 2 in / 5.1 cm

As a performative act, this work was put in service; viewers were invited to turn their back to the work and take an Instagram photo playing “self sanctification.” This shift of purpose was inspired by an interview with poet Jane Hirshfield on finding the Buddha casually in people.

 #sanctifythyself Instagram feed

Transliterations:
Amharic — Holi
Arabic — Abiad
English — White
German — Weiss
Hebrew — Lavan
Chinese — Bái
Japanese — Shiro
Latin — Niveus
Russian — Bhehley

<em>Rainbow, towards a New Balance (Made in the USA)</em>, 2013

Rainbow, towards a New Balance (Made in the USA), 2013

Silicone on wood
The word “white” in nine languages: Amharic, Arabic, English, German, Hebrew, Japanese, Chinese, Latin, Russian
diameter 42 in / 106.7 cm, depth 2 in / 5.1 cm

On loan by the Art in Embassies program for the U.S. Ambassador for the OECD in Paris.

#rainbowtowardsanewbalance Instagram feed

The color palette of Rainbow, towards a New Balance (Made in the USA) is drawn from a pair of athletic shoes belonging to the artist. 

Transliterations:
Amharic — Holi
Arabic — Abiad
English — White
German — Weiss
Hebrew — Lavan
Chinese — Bái
Japanese — Shiro
Latin — Niveus
Russian — Bhehley

<em>Rainbow, Toward a New Balance</em>

Rainbow, Toward a New Balance

Shoes worn by the artist, Silicone on wood
The word “white” in nine languages: Amharic, Arabic, English, German, Hebrew, Japanese, Chinese, Latin, Russian
diameter 42 in / 106.7 cm, depth 2 in / 5.1 cm

The fluorescent color palette of Rainbow, towards a New Balance (Made in the USA) is drawn from a pair of athletic shoes belonging to the artist.  

Transliterations:
Amharic — Holi
Arabic — Abiad
English — White
German — Weiss
Hebrew — Lavan
Chinese — Bái
Japanese — Shiro
Latin — Niveus
Russian — Bhehley

<em>Deeply Concentric</em>, 2013

Deeply Concentric, 2013

Silicone on wood
The word “white” in nine languages: Amharic, Arabic, English, German, Hebrew, Japanese, Chinese, Latin, Russian
diameter 42 in / 106.7 cm, depth 2 in / 5.1 cm

The title, Deeply Concentric, comes from first complete English translation of Kandinsky’s seminal text “On the Spiritual in Art” (1946), by the Guggenheim Museum:  “Deeply concentric, each art is separated from the other, but on the other hand, they are combined by their innermost tendencies. Thus, it is found that every art has its own strength, which cannot be substituted for another. Therefore, we finally arrive at the encroachment of the power of the various arts upon one another.” 

Transliterations:
Amharic — Holi
Arabic — Abiad
English — White
German — Weiss
Hebrew — Lavan
Chinese — Bái
Japanese — Shiro
Latin — Niveus
Russian — Bhehley

<em>Blue Orange</em>, 2012

Blue Orange, 2012

Silicone and pigment on wood
diameter 42 in / 106.7 cm, depth 2 in / 5.1 cm
Private commission

Constructed with the ancestral languages of a prominent European family, this linguistic, historical portrait employs the word 'Orange' in French, Dutch, German, Russian, English and Sanskrit. Sanskrit points to the origin of the word 'Orange' as it relates to the fruit and draws a line to India and the Indo-European link. Cobalt blue is the second of the family's colors.

<em>Wavelength Range of Roughly 630–740 nm, No. 1</em>, 2007

Wavelength Range of Roughly 630–740 nm, No. 1, 2007

Silicone on wood
The word "red" in five languages: English, Hebrew, Arabic, Yiddish, and Spanish
diameter 40 in / 101.6 cm

Transliterations:

French – Rouge
English – Red
Arabic – Ahmar
Spanish – Rojo
Hebrew – Adom

<em>Wavelength Range of Roughly 630–740 nm</em>, No. 3, 2010

Wavelength Range of Roughly 630–740 nm, No. 3, 2010

Silicone on wood
The word "red" in five languages: English, Hebrew, Arabic, Yiddish, and Spanish
diameter 40 in / 101.6 cm

Transliterations:

French – Rouge
English – Red
Arabic – Ahmar
Spanish – Rojo
Hebrew – Adom

<em>Wavelength range of roughly 630–740nm No. 5</em>, 2011

Wavelength range of roughly 630–740nm No. 5, 2011

Silicone on wood
The word "red" in five languages: English, Hebrew, Arabic, Yiddish, and Spanish
diameter 40 in / 101.6 cm

Transliterations:

French – Rouge
English – Red
Arabic – Ahmar
Spanish – Rojo
Hebrew – Adom

<em>Wavelength Range of Roughly 630–740 nm, No. 7</em>, 2011

Wavelength Range of Roughly 630–740 nm, No. 7, 2011

Silicone on wood
The word "red" in five languages: English, Hebrew, Arabic, Yiddish, and Spanish
diameter 72 in / 182 cm

Transliterations:

French – Rouge
English – Red
Arabic – Ahmar
Spanish – Rojo
Hebrew – Adom

<em>Nude No. 1 (My Albers)</em>, 2010

Nude No. 1 (My Albers), 2010

Silicone on wood
The word “white” in nine languages: Amharic, Arabic, English, German, Hebrew, Japanese, Chinese, Latin, Russian
31.5 x 31.5 in / 80 x 80 cm
Private collection

The universalism of Josef Albers' Homage to the Square is examined in Nude, No. 1.

Transliterations:
Amharic — Holi
Arabic — Abiad
English — White
German — Weiss
Hebrew — Lavan
Chinese — Bái
Japanese — Shiro
Latin — Niveus
Russian — Bhehley

<em>Nude No. 2 (My Albers)</em>, 2010

Nude No. 2 (My Albers), 2010

Silicone on wood
The word “white” in nine languages: Amharic, Arabic, English, German, Hebrew, Japanese, Chinese, Latin, Russian
31.5 x 31.5 in / 80 x 80 cm

The universalism of Josef Albers' Homage to the Square is examined in Nude, No. 2

Transliterations:
Amharic — Holi
Arabic — Abiad
English — White
German — Weiss
Hebrew — Lavan
Chinese — Bái
Japanese — Shiro
Latin — Niveus
Russian — Bhehley

<em>Nude, No. 3 (My Swastika)</em>, 2010

Nude, No. 3 (My Swastika), 2010

Silicone on wood
The word “white” in nine languages: Amharic, Arabic, English, German, Hebrew, Japanese, Chinese, Latin, Russian
31.5 x 31.5 in / 80 x 80 cm

Transliterations:
Amharic — Holi
Arabic — Abiad
English — White
German — Weiss
Hebrew — Lavan
Chinese — Bái
Japanese — Shiro
Latin — Niveus
Russian — Bhehley

<em>Not Yet No. 2</em>, 2010

Not Yet No. 2, 2010

Wood on silicone, pencil
The phrase “not yet” in Hebrew and Arabic
72 x 72 in / 183 x 183 cm

Transliterations:
Hebrew – Ada’in Lo
Classical Arabic – Hatta

<em>Notyetness</em> Installation View

Notyetness Installation View

Installation view from the solo exhibition Notyetness at bitforms gallery, 2010.

<em>White No. 1</em>, 2010

White No. 1, 2010

Silicone on wood
The word "whore" in five languages: English, Arabic, Hebrew, Yiddish, Spanish
40 x 40 in / 101.6 x 101.6 cm

Transliterations: 

Hebrew - Zona
Arabic - Sharmoota
Yiddish - Hor
Spanish - Puta
English - Whore

<em>White, No. 2</em>, 2010

White, No. 2, 2010

Silicone on wood
The word "whore" in five languages: English, Arabic, Hebrew, Yiddish, Spanish
40 x 40 in / 101.6 x 101.6 cm

Transliterations: 

Hebrew - Zona
Arabic - Sharmoota
Yiddish - Hor
Spanish - Puta
English - Whore

<em>White No. 3</em>, 2010

White No. 3, 2010

Silicone on wood
The word "whore" in five languages: English, Arabic, Hebrew, Yiddish, Spanish
40 x 40 in / 101.6 x 101.6 cm

Transliterations: 

Hebrew - Zona
Arabic - Sharmoota
Yiddish - Hor
Spanish - Puta
English - Whore

<em>White No. 4</em>, 2010

White No. 4, 2010

Silicone on wood
The word "whore" in five languages: English, Arabic, Hebrew, Yiddish, Spanish
40 x 40 in / 101.6 x 101.6 cm

Transliterations: 

Hebrew - Zona
Arabic - Sharmoota
Yiddish - Hor
Spanish - Puta
English - Whore

<em>White No. 5</em>, 2010

White No. 5, 2010

Silicone on wood
The word "whore" in five languages: English, Arabic, Hebrew, Yiddish, Spanish
40 x 40 in / 101.6 x 101.6 cm

Transliterations: 

Hebrew - Zona
Arabic - Sharmoota
Yiddish - Hor
Spanish - Puta
English - Whore

<em>Sunspot</em>, 2010

Sunspot, 2010

Silicone on wood
words for “mother”, “father”, “son”, and “daughter” in Hebrew
24.5 x 24.5 in / 62 x 62 cm

In Hebrew, the words “av”, “em”, “ben”, and “bat” are all two letter words. These ancient words, born in the Middle East, are organized over the alphabet in such a way that they encompass all letters.

Transliterations:
Father – Av
Mother – Em
Son – Ben
Daughter – Bat

<em>My Mondrian: Composition C (No. III) with Red, Yellow and Blue</em>, 2009

My Mondrian: Composition C (No. III) with Red, Yellow and Blue, 2009

Loctite, wood, rubber words in four languages: English, Arabic, Hebrew, Yiddish 
24 x 24 x 2 in / 61 x 61 x 5 cm
Private collection

Mondrian’s original 1935 painting is recreated using the names of all seven pigments used in the original (cadmium red, cadmium yellow, cobalt blue, ultramarine, zinc white, lead white, and bone black), translated and transliterated into four languages (English, Arabic, Hebrew and Yiddish) and cut from natural white rubber. 

<em>My Mondrian: Composition in Red, Blue, and Yellow</em>, 2009

My Mondrian: Composition in Red, Blue, and Yellow, 2009

Loctite, wood, rubber words in four languages: English, Arabic, Hebrew, Yiddish 
24 x 24 x 2 in / 61 x 61 x 5 cm

Mondrian’s original 1930 painting is recreated using the names of all seven pigments used in the original (cadmium red, cadmium yellow, cobalt blue, ultramarine, zinc white, lead white, and bone black), translated and transliterated into four languages (English, Arabic, Hebrew and Yiddish) and cut from natural white rubber. 

 

<em>White/Binary</em>, 2009

White/Binary, 2009

Rubber and loctite on wood
The word "white" in English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and Arabic
22 x 22 in / 55 x 55 cm

Inspired by two spiritual sources: Malevich’s Suprematist Composition: White on White, 1918, and a Talmudic commentary that suggests that an idea can exist in two contradicting states: a truth and a parable at the same time. 

Transliterations:

English - White
Hebrew - Lavan
Yiddish - Weiss
Arabic - Abiad

<em>Orange, for Malevich</em>, 2007

Orange, for Malevich, 2007

Loctite on wood 
The word "orange" in four languages: English, Arabic, Hebrew, Yiddish

24 x 24 x 2 in / 61 x 61 x 5 cm

Transliterations:

English – Orange
Arabic – Bourtoukali
Hebrew – Katom
Yiddish – Aranje

<em>Glory Hole</em>, 2009

Glory Hole, 2009

Rubber and loctite on wood panel
The word "holy" in four languages: Hebrew, English, Arabic, and Yiddish
40 x 40 in / 100 x 100 cm
Private collection

Transliterations: 

Hebrew - Kadosh 
English - Holy 
Arabic - Maqadas 
Yiddish - Hailik 

<em>White in White</em>, 2009

White in White, 2009

Rubber and loctite on wood
The words "yellow" and "red" in English, Hebrew, Arabic and Yiddish.
22 x 22 in / 55 x 55 cm
Private collection

White in White draws its title from Malevich’s painting White on White, 1918. 

<em>Melancholia</em>, 2009

Melancholia, 2009

Almond tree resin, wood, rubber
Languages: German (in the Hebrew alphabet), English
12 x 16.5 x 2.5 in / 30.5 x 41.9 x 6.4 cm

Melancholia was created with rubber and almond trees amber gathered in the mountains for Jerusalem during a residency at Mamuta Art Center in Ein Karem.  The poem I love the dark hours of my being by Rainer Maria Rilke is introduced between the rows of crystallized gum, translated to English and transliterated into the Yiddish alphabet (Hebrew alphabet appropriated for the Germanic language).

Ich liebe meines Wesens Dunkelstunden

I love the dark hours of my being.
My mind deepens into them.
There I can find, as in old letters,
the days of my life, already lived,
and held like a legend, and understood.

Then the knowing comes: I can open
to another life that’s wide and timeless.

So I am sometimes like a tree
rustling over a gravesite
and making real the dream
of the one its living roots 
embrace:

a dream once lost
among sorrows and songs

—Rainer Maria Rilke, Love Poems to God.
(translated by Anita Barrows and Joanna Marie Macy)

<em>Untitled (L'Origine)</em>, 2008

Untitled (L'Origine), 2008

Nails and 1,155 rubber text units in four languages:
The word "eye" in English, Arabic, Hebrew, and Yiddish
113 x 103 x 1 in / 287 x 261.6 x 2.5 cm
1 Private collection + 1

The work takes it's name from Gustave Courbet's L'Origine du Monde

View installation process in stopmotion.

Installing Untitled (L'Origine), 2009

Music by Yoav Gal from Bit by Bit, Cell by Cell, 2005.

<em>Love Letter</em>, 2009

Love Letter, 2009

Site-specific installation 
Text carved into drywall, pencil, marker 
Dimensions vary

The love letter Extreme Beauty is cut out of the gallery wall. 

Love Letter 565/35
Sunset/Sunrise

Beloved, 

I found the key to extreme beauty,
but not the keyhole. 
I tried in all the holes of my body. 
None seemed to fit. 

Yours forever 
Yours Sunset/Sunrise, forever Yours 
Yours forever yours

<em>Love Letter</em>, 2009 (detail)

Love Letter, 2009 (detail)

Site-specific installation - detail view 
Text carved into drywall, pencil, marker 
Dimensions vary

The love letter Extreme Beauty is cut out of the gallery wall. 

Love Letter 565/35
Sunset/Sunrise

Beloved, 

I found the key to extreme beauty,
but not the keyhole. 
I tried in all the holes of my body.
None seemed to fit. 

Yours forever 
Yours Sunset/Sunrise, forever Yours 
Yours forever yours

<em>Kiss</em>, 2007

Kiss, 2007

Rubber, 892 pins
67.5 x 67.5 in / 180 x 180 cm

The word "kiss" in English, Arabic (qobla), and Hebrew (neshika), rendered in two matrices and lit by several shades of white light.

<em>Your Hand In Mine</em>, 2008

Your Hand In Mine, 2008

Pins and rubber words
The phrase "your hand in mine" in English, Hebrew, and Arabic
30 3/8 x 30 3/8 in / 77 x 77 cm
Edition of 3

The phrase "your hand in mine" takes four words in English, three in Arabic and two in Hebrew. The work is lit by three tones of white light.

 

<em>Lemon</em>, 2008

Lemon, 2008

Rubber and loctite
Approx. 50 x 50 in / 127 x 127 cm

Lemon is made from the word "lemon," in forty languages. From Japan to Latin America through the Mediterranean, in these forty languages the word ‘lemon’ has a similar pronunciation, evidence of human activity: trade, conquest and migration. Lemon also includes the first line from the poem "Perfection" by Williams Carlos Williams. Williams’ apple is replaced with lemon: “Oh lovely (apple) lemon! Beautiful and completely rotten, [...]”

Languages: Dutch, Maltese, Afrikaans, Catalan, Galician, Papiamentu, Swahili, Thai, Bân-lâm-gú, Tongan, Irish, Albanian, Slovene, Wolof, Basque, Portuguese, Italian, Bulgarian, Russian, Macedonian, Serbian, Croatian, Romanian, Papago, Spanish, Greek, Turkish, Old French and Old Italian, Farsi, Urdu, Hebrew, Arabic, Bengali, Hindi, Assamese, Chinese, Uyghur, Korean, and English.

<em>Lemon</em>, 2007 (detail)

Lemon, 2007 (detail)

<em>Untitled (Lace)</em>, 2008

Untitled (Lace), 2008

Rubber, pins
66 x 62 in / 167.5 x 157.5 cm
Unavailable

This lacy topography is made of hundreds of rubber words in English, Hebrew, and Arabic, glued one word at a time with industrial automobile glue to form the text that appears as the signature of all the love letters in net art trilogy World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal: "Yours forever, your sunset/sunrise forever yours, your forever yours." 

<em>Conception/Mis</em>, 2007

Conception/Mis, 2007

Rubber, silver findings, pins, rubber glue
20 x 10 x 2 in / 51 x 25 x 5 cm
Private collection + 1

The original text in three languages (English, Hebrew, and Arabic) is a love letter, Conception/Mis, from the net artwork Object of Desire

The text object was built on a friend - around the neck and down the back. The silver chains wrapped around the rib cage and the single vertical line linked the neck with the tip of the text at the tailbone.

+ + +
Love letter 685.2/9: Conception/Mis
Sunset/Sunrise

Beloved,

Footprints left in the dust stretched into the distance. At the vanishing point I saw your face. Your face, alone, floating. Bearing the same expression you wore when you realized I was determined to take on the mission.

I called it a mission, you called it a misconception.

Ever since I learned about the portal I've grown restless. Standing in the kitchen the day before I crossed over: You pressed against the counter, staring in disbelief whenever I muttered treasure. You looked out the window. Cement wall of the next building spilled grey light on the floor. Emotions exploded silently. I edged toward the refrigerator to avoid the debris. You said nothing. I said nothing. Your face faded. I faced forward.

Yours forever
Your sunset/sunrise forever yours
Yours forever yours

<em>10^1291+1</em>, 2007

10^1291+1, 2007

Rubber, silver findings and pins
20 x 10 x 2 in / 51 x 25 x 5 cm

10^1291+1 was built around the body of a friend. It consists of a single large number. Hanging around the neck, the number drops down her back. The long chain continues between the legs and connects to the neck from the front. The number begins with 1 and ends with 1. 

<em>Cut</em>, 2007

Cut, 2007

Rubber, silver findings, pins, enamel paint, and Sculpy
Approx. 78 x 144 in / 200 x 365 cm

Cut was constructed around the body of a friend. A tall man, his dimensions and circumferences are captured in the lengths of the silver chains. The narrative, in English, Arabic and Hebrew, links to the scene Cut from the net artwork, Object of Desire, which describes an involuntary act of circumcision of the middle finger.

<em>Thighlets</em>, 2007

Thighlets, 2007

Rubber, silver findings and pins
Approx. 31.5 x 71 in / 80 x 180 cm

Thighlets was constructed around the artist's thighs. The rubber words are cut from an original text, the love letter Extreme Beauty, from the trilogy World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal. The structure is brought back to the wall and hung on pins.

+ + +

Love letter 565/34
Sunset/Sunrise

I found the key to extreme beauty but not the keyhole.
I tried it in all the holes of my body. None seemed to fit.

yours forever
your sunset/sunrise forever yours
yours forever yours

<em>Horizon</em>, 2007

Horizon, 2007

Rubber and pins
Approx. 384 in / 1000 cm

Thousands of rubber words are pinned to the wall. The word combination "Sunset/Sunrise" in English, Hebrew, and Arabic forms a ragged horizon. 

In English, sunset and sunrise point to a human-centric experience, as the sun neither rise nor sinks. In Arabic, the words are derived from the words east (ghoroob) and west (shorooq), pointing to a geographically-coordinated language. In Hebrew the words translate into shine (zrikha - root for "east'") and submerge (shki'a).

<em>Horizon</em> (performed), 2011

Horizon (performed), 2011

Charcoal on wall

A performance adaptation of a 2007 piece by the same title. This session took place at the Soft Borders exhibition at the FCL/Ar-UNESP Universidade Estadual Paulista, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Curated by Basak Senova.