<em>A Traveler's Journal, Chapter 1: Forever</em>, 1999

A Traveler's Journal, Chapter 1: Forever, 1999

Website
http://www.worldofawe.net/

Forever is the first chapter of World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal. It includes love letters and diary entries, descriptions of navigation tools and treasure hunting equipment. The interface is based by early Mac graphical user interface design and Windows 3.1. Menu standards are appropriated to serves as entry points to this diaristic and epistolary narrative. 

Deeply yearning, an anonymous protagonist searches for a lost treasure in a parallel world. The Traveler's Journal employs a nostalgic, solitary voice to meditate on our obsession with digital technology.

Enter Forever

Forever was included in the 2002 Whitney Biennial and was shown on a laptop.

<em>A Traveler's Journal, Chapter 2: Destruction & Mending</em>

A Traveler's Journal, Chapter 2: Destruction & Mending

Website
http://www.worldofawe.net/

The second chapter of World of Awe: A Traveler's JournalDestruction & Mending was commissioned and exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The chapter employs a bomb graphic icon and the photographic pearl to carry the theme of destruction and mending.

Enter Destruction & Mending

 

A Traveler's Journal, Chapter 3: Object of Desire, 2006

A Traveler's Journal, Chapter 3: Object of Desire, 2006

Website
http://www.worldofawe.net/

Object of Desire is a departure from the first two chapters of World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal. Made up of 15 scenes, animated in 3D and executed in Flash, the narrative is presented in three languages: English, Hebrew, and Arabic (appearance for French, Italian, and Spanish). The work marks the burgeoning interest in the Internet as an endless polyglot space.

Object of Desire explores early literary themes and motifs born in the Middle East and Mediterranean cultures that are still vibrant in contemporary culture. Biblical themes and legends receive a new treatment that take into consideration the digital advancement, in the same nostalgic and romantic voice identified with the traveler.

Funded by the Rockefeller Media grant and the MFA program at RPI, Object of Desire was exhibited among other places at The Jewish Museum in New York and EMST Museum in Athens.

Enter Object of Desire

 

<em>Object of Desire Installation</em>, 2007

Object of Desire Installation, 2007

Reclaimed wood, Atari joystick, button, laptop, projector, and LCD screen.
Collection of the EMST museum in Athens, Greece

Interactive installation of Chapter 3, Object of Desire. The ark chair is based on an image of a Noah's ark toy from the 1895 Montgomery Ward & Co. Catalogue and Buyer's Guide. To navigate the website, one uses an original Atari joystick built into the left arm and a red button built into the right.

The work was created for the one-person Media Center exhibition at the Jewish Museum, 2007. 

<em>Extreme Beauty</em>, 2001

Extreme Beauty, 2001

Net Art

Created for Rhizome's splash page series.

http://worldofawe.net/extremebeauty/extremebeauty.html

<em>Window</em>, 2001

Window, 2001

Internet and Flash plugin
Published on Drunken Boat 

http://www.drunkenboat.com/db2/kanarek/kanarek.html

Roam 2.0, 2001

Roam 2.0, 2001

Custom software for PC
Commissioned by the Alternative Museum
Software programmed by Luiz Perez

Roam 2.0 was an infinitely generative 3d terrain software. Navigation had two modes: Automatic and user controlled. The intention was to create a 3D game environment for the meditative experience of roaming.

Although the software is now defunct, a series of screenshots of the terrain mapped with different images remain viewable.

<em>The mRB: A prototype for a super toy</em>, 2002

The mRB: A prototype for a super toy, 2002

Net art and installation
Collaboration with bnode architects

Created during a residency at Eyebeam, the project speculates on a super-toy called the mRB, modeled after the moodRingBaby mentioned in the World of Awenarrative.

The project was installed at the exhibition Beta Launchat Eyebeam.

<em>Love Letter Demolition Performance</em>, 2010

Love Letter Demolition Performance, 2010

Ladder, Sawzall, Louboutin stilettos, fishnets, lipstick, and silk dress

The demolition of the site-specific piece was the closing event of the solo exhibition Notyetness at bitforms gallery. The demolition was performed for the cameras, to exist publically as documentation.

<em>Love Letter Demolition Performance</em>, 2010

Love Letter Demolition Performance, 2010

Ladder, Sawzall, Louboutin stilettos, fishnets, lipstick, and silk dress

The demolition of the site-specific piece was the closing event of the solo exhibition Notyetness at bitforms gallery. The demolition was performed for the cameras, to exist publically as documentation.

<em>Heart In Heart</em>, 2004

Heart In Heart, 2004

Sheer organza ribbon, two metal meathooks, aircraft cable
Dimensions variable
Collection of EMST Museum, Athens, Greece

Text: love letters from World of Awe, Chapters One and TwoLinux Kernel source code.

<em>Feedback-Loop</em>, 2004

Feedback-Loop, 2004

Steel, candle, pearl, hand drawn ink and pencil on parchment
20 x 15 x 27 in / 50.8 x 38 x 68.6 cm
Edition of 3

Text: The Love Letter: 69.325 from World of Awe, Chapter 2, Destruction & Mending (front); Linux Kernel file source code defining schedule task (back)

<em>Fall Collection: Keys, Dice, Pearls</em>, 2010

Fall Collection: Keys, Dice, Pearls, 2010

Table with sculptures
Self-hardening clay, steel, wood, silver, 14k gold
dimensions variable

<em>Key No. 2, 2010</em>

Key No. 2, 2010

Self-hardening clay, steel, wood, 14k gold chain and lettering
12.25" x 6" x 5.75" / 31.1 x 15.2 x 14.6 cm

Text: "I Found the Key to Extreme Beauty"

<em>Keys No. 3</em>, 2010

Keys No. 3, 2010

Table display with sculptures
self-hardening clay, steel, wood, silver, 14 k gold

Text: "I found the key to extreme beauty."

<em>Speaker Tree</em>, 2001

Speaker Tree, 2001

Speakers, computer, cables, wires, soundtrack
Dimensions variable

Audio from Hello, 2002

Installation from the World of Awe solo exhibition at The Moving Image Gallery, New York, directed by curator Michele Thursz, June 7 - June 30, 2001

<em>Treasure Crumbs Capsule</em>, 2001

Treasure Crumbs Capsule, 2001

Gelatin capsule, candy sprinkles, acrylic box
1 x 1 x 1 in / 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 cm
Unlimited edition

Based on "treasure crumbs" from World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal.

<em>Roam</em>, 2001

Roam, 2001

Computer, speakers, custom self-generating landscape software, soundtrack
Dimensions variable

Installation from the World of Awe solo exhibition at The Moving Image Gallery, New York, directed by curator Michele Thursz, June 7 - June 30, 2001.

<em>Tent</em>, 2001

Tent, 2001

Computers, keyboards, plastic, stick, nails, soundtrack

An audio track of several SimpleText Macintosh voices "read" a diary entry from World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal describing the descent into Silicon Canyon (the graveyard for all the hardware and software ever created). 

The installation took place at Moving Image Gallery, NYC from June 7 - June 30, 2001.

<em>Travelog 159-78: Oldy, Paragraph 7</em>, 2011

Travelog 159-78: Oldy, Paragraph 7, 2011

Handset letterpress print, purple ink on paper
11.25 x 14.25" / 28.6 x 36.2 cm
1/13 2AP

Letterpress prints of a paragraph from World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal, handset and printed during an artist's visit to the Goldsmith Press & Rare Type Collection at Austin Peay State University. 

Text:

Travelog 159-78: Oldy, paragraph 7

The adobe cabin was the color of gravel. Across the room was a small door that looked like a cooler. Made of stainless steel, it was bolted with a heavy lock. This must be where she kept the water. She wasn’t eager to answer questions and I didn’t poke. I stood there for a while, yet few words passed. Once escaped from a mouth, a word lingered in the stiffness that thickened the air. The word 'Yes,' which I emitted, spread around me, barely reaching her. She waited for it to dissipate and followed up with 'Camembert' that exploded slowly and filled up all corners of the cabin. It lasted an eon, possibly because of the silent syllables. Time passed with no more then twelve or thirteen words, but I never felt bothered. The silences between words were brimming with interests. Micro events called into being whole worlds in the spaces within spaces. Between worlds, I saw glimpses of the infinite... then it all went away. It was quiet. Just the wind. The curtain moved slightly.

<em>Travelog 159-78: Oldy, Paragraph 7</em>, 2010

Travelog 159-78: Oldy, Paragraph 7, 2010

Vinyl wall text
Dimensions variable
Edition of 6

Text:

Travelog 159-78: Oldy, paragraph 7

The adobe cabin was the color of gravel. Across the room was a small door that looked like a cooler. Made of stainless steel, it was bolted with a heavy lock. This must be where she kept the water. She wasn't eager to answer questions and I didn't poke. I stood there for a while, yet few words passed. Once escaped from a mouth, a word lingered in the stiffness that thickened the air. The word 'Yes,' which I emitted, spread around me, barely reaching her. She waited for it to dissipate and followed up with 'Camembert' that exploded slowly and filled up all corners of the cabin. It lasted an eon, possibly because of the silent syllables. Time passed with no more than twelve or thirteen words, but I never felt bothered. The silences between words were brimming with interests. Micro events called into being whole worlds in the spaces within spaces. Between worlds, I saw glimpses of the infinite... then it all went away. It was quiet. Just the wind. The curtain moved slightly.

<em>Travelog 159-78: Oldy, Paragraph 7</em>, 2010

Travelog 159-78: Oldy, Paragraph 7, 2010

Vinyl wall text
Dimensions variable

 

<em>Text Object: Software327-25.txt</em>, 2004

Text Object: Software327-25.txt, 2004

Silkscreen on parchment
Diary entry from World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal silk-screened on parchment
Font: Courier

Text:


File: software327-25.txt Software inventory from Silicon Canyon

--------------------------------------------------------------

Unlike the computers that I could just turn over and open, the software I found in the canyon was considerably more complicated to examine. I've compiled an arbitrary list of 529software titles that I managed to separate from a dense pile, however, this list represents but a tiny fraction of all the code that was lying around. Looking at my collection reveals that most of the applications were written around the end of the 20th century and many of them were screensavers … who would imagine so many were made?Cars, flowers, Mars,Van Gogh, cats, sunsets. I'm looking at an F-15 Eagle screensaver thinking to myself that all this software is like a supermarket of canned culture. I nudge over a couple of SCSI cables to find a screensaver called Jumpin' Jesus on a Pogo Stick.Later, when I was climbing over a large heap of this hard-soft-junk, I began hypothesizing: imagine it was the end of the world and software titles were the only remnants, what portrait of a civilization could emerge based solely on that information? Frankly, I'm tempted to say that such evidence may actually form a semi-authentic picture.

Now I should type a few words about the procedure I used to collect the code: I found the 529 titles sprawling in and around an Atari800XL, an Apple Quadra 6100 and a Sony VAIO Laptop.The disturbance initiated by moving the hardware caused strings of code to become airborne like miniature feathers, sending me into sets of uncontrollable sneezes. Can one be allergic to source code? The easiest way to pick the code is to grab the first few characters, especially the '#' with pincers and the rest usually follows like threads of a very fine material. First come the headers, the crowns on the code, these jewels of information that usually contain the title,author's name, version, revisions history and copyright info, often decorated with a touch of the author's personal style. Reading the authors' names diffuses my loneliness. Pleasure increases particularly with large, open-source network projects like the Linux operating system, for example. So many have worked on it—indeed a labor of love—and left their mark, which is how in Silicon Canyon I came to know of davidm@cs.arizona.edu, david.rusling@reo.mts.dec.com, jestabro@amt.tay1.dec.com, andrea@suse.de, ink@jurassic.park.msu.ru, manson@santafe.edu, davidm@azstarnet.com, Phillip.Ezolt@compaq.com, jbglaw@lug-owl.de, J.A.K.Mouw@its.tudelft.nl, bowman@math.ualberta.ca, dl8bcu@gmx.net, rick.gorton@alpha-processor.com, rth@tamu.edu, hobbs@steven.zko.dec.com, sjhill@cotw.com, nico@cam.org, shane@minirl.com, connors@hpl.hp.com, ch@hpl.hp.com, J.A.Pouwelse@its.tudelft.nl, abraham@2d3d.co.za, john+@cs.cmu.edu, jco@ict.es, juergen.messerer@siemens.ch, stefan.eletzhofer@gmx.de, cbrake@accelent.com, sjcho@east.isi.edu, chester@linux.org.tw andphilb@gnu.org to name a few. They make a nice group of friends when my imagination soars. However, Linus' email was nowhere to be found.

I forgot to mention that all the software inside the machines had some how unassembled-uncompiled and was spilling out of the hard drives like overflowing soufflés. Really, in such degraded conditions one would expect to see actual binary data of ones and zeros and not a Babylonian chaos of high-level languages, entangled.

The first software I pulled was the Blackjack Analyzer 2.0. I carefully grabbed the header from under the Atari and the C++ routines followed behind. To preserve it, I looped the string around my index finger and glued the tail with saliva. I blew on it a little and when it dried I rolled it off my finger into a small, white plastic box I found a few feet away. In that manner I collected lots of software and filled up a few boxes, when suddenly I pulled thegood-old text editorSimpleText. It was like meeting an old friend! Inits compiled stateSimpleText, the Apple software, can recite typed text in 20 different voices. Oh Agnes, Fred, Zarvox, my favorite voices, how I miss you!

The SimpleText code was in fine condition but I was only able to separate the dropdown menus to integrate into my selfmade laptop. Perhaps the other strings could be knitted into a blanket if it ever gets cold.

<em>Love Letter</em>, 2009

Love Letter, 2009

Site-specific installation 
Text carved into drywall, pencil, marker 
Dimensions vary

The love letter Extreme Beauty is cut out of the gallery wall. 

Love Letter 565/35
Sunset/Sunrise

Beloved, 

I found the key to extreme beauty, but not the keyhole. 
I tried in all the holes of my body, but none seemed to fit. 

Yours forever 
Yours Sunset/Sunrise, forever Yours 
Yours forever yours

<em>Thighlets</em>, 2007

Thighlets, 2007

Rubber, silver findings, and pins
Approx. 31.5 x 71 in / 80 x 180 cm

Thighlets was constructed around the artist's thighs. The rubber words, in English, Hebrew and Arabic, are cut from the love letter Extreme Beauty, from the trilogy World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal. The construction is brought back to the wall and hung on pins.

+ + +

Love letter 565/34
Sunset/Sunrise

I found the key to extreme beauty but not the keyhole. I tried it in all the holes of my body. None seemed to fit.

yours forever
your sunset/sunrise forever yours
yours forever yours

<em>Untitled (Lace)</em>, 2008

Untitled (Lace), 2008

Rubber, pins
66 x 62 in / 167.5 x 157.5 cm
Unavailable

This lacy topography is made of hundreds of rubber words in English, Hebrew, and Arabic, glued one word at a time with industrial automobile glue to form the text that appears as the signature of all the love letters in net art trilogy World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal: "Yours forever, your sunset/sunrise forever yours, your forever yours." 

<em>Conception/Mis</em>, 2007

Conception/Mis, 2007

Rubber, silver findings, pins, rubber glue
20 x 10 x 2 in / 51 x 25 x 5 cm
Private collection + 1

The original text in three languages (English, Hebrew, and Arabic) is a love letter, Conception/Mis, from the net artwork Object of Desire

The text object was built on a friend - around the neck and down the back. The silver chains wrapped around the rib cage and the single vertical line linked the neck with the tip of the text at the tailbone.

+ + +
Love letter 685.2/9: Conception/Mis
Sunset/Sunrise

Beloved,

Footprints left in the dust stretched into the distance. At the vanishing point I saw your face. Your face, alone, floating. Bearing the same expression you wore when you realized I was determined to take on the mission.

I called it a mission, you called it a misconception.

Ever since I learned about the portal I've grown restless. Standing in the kitchen the day before I crossed over: You pressed against the counter, staring in disbelief whenever I muttered treasure. You looked out the window. Cement wall of the next building spilled grey light on the floor. Emotions exploded silently. I edged toward the refrigerator to avoid the debris. You said nothing. I said nothing. Your face faded. I faced forward.

Yours forever
Your sunset/sunrise forever yours
Yours forever yours

<em>Cut</em>, 2007

Cut, 2007

Rubber, silver findings, pins, enamel paint, and Sculpy
Approx. 78 x 144 in / 200 x 365 cm

Cut was constructed around the body of a friend. A tall man, his dimensions and circumferences are captured in the lengths of the silver chains. The narrative, in English, Arabic and Hebrew, links to the scene Cut from the net artwork, Object of Desire, which describes an involuntary act of circumcision of the middle finger.

<em>Horizon</em>, 2007

Horizon, 2007

Rubber and pins
Approx. 384 in / 1000 cm

Thousands of rubber words are pinned to the wall. The word combination "Sunset/Sunrise" in English, Hebrew, and Arabic forms a ragged horizon. 

In English, sunset and sunrise point to a human-centric experience, as the sun neither rise nor sinks. In Arabic, the words are derived from the words east (ghoroob) and west (shorooq), pointing to a geographically-coordinated language. In Hebrew the words translate into shine (zrikha - root for 'east') and submerge (shki'a).

<em>Horizon</em> (performed), 2011

Horizon (performed), 2011

Charcoal on wall

A performance adaptation of a 2007 by the same title. This session took place at theSoft Borders exhibition at the FCL/Ar-UNESP Universidade Estadual Paulista, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Curated by Basak Senova.

<em>Potentially Endless A</em>, 2007

Potentially Endless A, 2007

Lambda print
44.5 x 70" / 113 x 178 cm
Edition of 3

This image is animated in the scene Copy, from Object of Desire:

Travelog 720.5/2: Copy
Sunset/Sunrise

Tangerine sky. A ray illuminates my neck. It stays there. Time suspended. I key my notes into the laptop. Letters dispel the handwriting and elude my temper, paper, and the ballpoint pen.

The laptop welcomes the letters and assigns them numbers. Electric-alive, my idiom flickers on the screen. Delighted in the power of computation: Copy, paste, find, replace. CTRL+Z. Power. Speed. I penetrate.

<em>Potentially Endless B</em>, 2007

Potentially Endless B, 2007

Lambda print
44.5 x 70 in / 113 x 178 cm
Edition of 3

This landscape is "torn" by mapping a journalistic photo of a political murder that circulated in the news several years ago. Its source is the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

<em>Terrain 9_3a_5: Entries And Exits</em>, 2002

Terrain 9_3a_5: Entries And Exits, 2002

Ink drawing on Lambda print plexi-mounted
44 x 34 in / 112 x 86 cm
Unique

About traffic data: As visitors navigate the net artwork World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal they leave tracking data like footprints. That data includes IP address, pages visited and time of entry. The data is then filtered and hand-drawn, spontaneously, on the 3D desert landscape print. 

Here the traffic data was filtered to identify the first and last diary entry accessed by several visitors. The difference in timestamps indicate the time they spent in the net artwork.

<em>Terrain6e_6: Ladders, Cranes And Hidden Pathways</em>, 2006

Terrain6e_6: Ladders, Cranes And Hidden Pathways, 2006

Ink drawing on Lambda print
30 x 40 in / 76 x 102 cm
Unique

As visitors navigate World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal, they leave behind tracking data including IP address, pages visited, and time of download requests. These traces are then filtered and spontaneously hand-drawn on the 3D desert landscape print. 

<em>Terrain6_6: Time Swarm</em>, 2006

Terrain6_6: Time Swarm, 2006

Ink drawing on Lambda print
30 x 40 in / 76 x 102 cm
Unique

As visitors navigate World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal, they leave behind tracking data including IP address, pages visited, and time of download requests. These traces are then filtered and spontaneously hand-drawn on the 3D desert landscape print. 

This data represents a swarm of timestamps that hit the server over a period of several months.

<em>Terrain6c_3: Ninty Seconds</em>, 2006

Terrain6c_3: Ninty Seconds, 2006

Ink drawing on Lambda print
30 x 40 in / 76 x 102 cm
Unique

As visitors navigate World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal, they leave behind tracking data including IP address, pages visited, and time of download requests. These traces are then filtered and spontaneously hand-drawn on the 3D desert landscape print. 

The data in this piece represents the first 90 seconds of the day: 00:00:00 – 00:01:30.

<em>Undo</em>, 2007

Undo, 2007

Ink drawing on Lambda print
29 x 42.5 in / 74 x 108 cm
Unique 

A rendering from the scene Undo in Object of Desire, using an image from the 1895 Montgomery Ward & Co. Catalogue and Buyer's Guide as the basis for the ark model. The hand-drawing interprets traffic data left by those who visited the Undo webpages, then hosted on a server in Tel Aviv by the Israeli Center for Digital Art's ArtLab.

This work was included in the solo exhibition Object of Desire exhibition at the Jewish Museum's Media Center in New York.

<em>Terrain9_3a_6: Crumbs</em>, 2007

Terrain9_3a_6: Crumbs, 2007

Ink drawing on Lambda print
20 x 15 in / 51 x 38 cm
Unique
Private collection

A rendering from the scene Crumbs in Object of Desire. The ink drawing interprets traffic data left by those who visited the Crumbs webpages, then hosted on a server in Ramallah, Palestine.

<em>Pod</em>, 2004

Pod, 2004

Digital C-Print
23 x 30 1/2 in / 58.6 x 77.2 cm
60 3/4 x 66 in / 154.2 x 167.6 cm
Edition of 6, 1 AP

"Cycles" is a photographic series of performed actions, as written in computer code (Linux Kernel). This machine language, a narrative of instructions based on English, is then transferred to organza ribbon. A single character, the User, performs machine and human functions in a sterile, functional environment warmed by low orange light reminiscent of a sunset or sunrise.

The final resting point for the code is in two sculptures: SPIN_LOCK and Heart in Heart.

<em>Attach</em>, 2004

Attach, 2004

Digital C-Print
23 x 30 1/2 in / 58.6 x 77.2 cm
60 3/4 x 66 in / 154.2 x 167.6 cm
Edition of 6, 1 AP

"Cycles" is a photographic series of performed actions, as written in computer code (Linux Kernel). This machine language, a narrative of instructions based on English, is then transferred to organza ribbon. A single character, the User, performs machine and human functions in a sterile, functional environment warmed by low orange light reminiscent of a sunset or sunrise.

The final resting point for the code is in two sculptures: SPIN_LOCK and Heart in Heart.

<em>Ready</em>, 2004

Ready, 2004

Digital C-print
28 x 21.5 in / 71.1 x 54.6 cm 
66 x 51.75 in / 167.6 x 131.4 cm 
Edition of 6, 1 AP

"Cycles" is a photographic series of performed actions, as written in computer code (Linux Kernel). This machine language, a narrative of instructions based on English, is then transferred to organza ribbon. A single character, the User, performs machine and human functions in a sterile, functional environment warmed by low orange light reminiscent of a sunset or sunrise.

The final resting point for the code is in two sculptures: SPIN_LOCK and Heart in Heart.

<em>Sockets</em>, 2004

Sockets, 2004

Digital C-Print
24 5/8 x 18 1/2 in / 62.5 x 47 cm
66 x 51 in / 167.6 x 129.5 cm
Edition of 6, 1 AP

"Cycles" is a photographic series of performed actions, as written in computer code (Linux Kernel). This machine language, a narrative of instructions based on English, is then transferred to organza ribbon. A single character, the User, performs machine and human functions in a sterile, functional environment warmed by low orange light reminiscent of a sunset or sunrise.

The final resting point for the code is in two sculptures: SPIN_LOCK and Heart in Heart.

<em>Pause</em>, 2004

Pause, 2004

Digital C-Print
28 x 21 1/2 / 71.1 x 54.6 cm
66 x 51 3/4 / 167.6 x 131.4 cm
Edition of 6, 1 AP

"Cycles" is a photographic series of performed actions, as written in computer code (Linux Kernel). This machine language, a narrative of instructions based on English, is then transferred to organza ribbon. A single character, the User, performs machine and human functions in a sterile, functional environment warmed by low orange light reminiscent of a sunset or sunrise.

The final resting point for the code is in two sculptures: SPIN_LOCK and Heart in Heart.

<em>Shedding</em>, 2004

Shedding, 2004

Digital C-Print
44 x 34 in / 112 x 86 cm
Edition of 6, 1 AP

"Cycles" is a photographic series of performed actions, as written in computer code (Linux Kernel). This machine language, a narrative of instructions based on English, is then transferred to organza ribbon. A single character, the User, performs machine and human functions in a sterile, functional environment warmed by low orange light reminiscent of a sunset or sunrise.

The final resting point for the code is in two sculptures: SPIN_LOCK and Heart in Heart.

<em>Sleep Mode</em>, 2004

Sleep Mode, 2004

Digital C-print
13.5 x 18.5 in / 34 x 46.7 cm
44 x 34 in / 112 x 86 cm 
Edition of 6, 1 AP

"Cycles" is a photographic series of performed actions, as written in computer code (Linux Kernel). This machine language, a narrative of instructions based on English, is then transferred to organza ribbon. A single character, the User, performs machine and human functions in a sterile, functional environment warmed by low orange light reminiscent of a sunset or sunrise.

The final resting point for the code is in two sculptures: SPIN_LOCK and Heart in Heart.

<em>Dress Code</em>, 2004

Dress Code, 2004

Digital C-Print
44 x 34 in / 112 x 86 cm
Edition of 6, 1 AP

"Cycles" is a photographic series of performed actions, as written in computer code (Linux Kernel). This machine language, a narrative of instructions based on English, is then transferred to organza ribbon. A single character, the User, performs machine and human functions in a sterile, functional environment warmed by low orange light reminiscent of a sunset or sunrise.

The final resting point for the code is in two sculptures: SPIN_LOCK and Heart in Heart.

<em>Gaze</em>, 2004

Gaze, 2004

Digital C-print
13.5 x 18.5 in / 34 x 46.7 cm 
44 x 34 in / 112 x 86 cm 
Edition of 6, 1 AP

"Cycles" is a photographic series of performed actions, as written in computer code (Linux Kernel). This machine language, a narrative of instructions based on English, is then transferred to organza ribbon. A single character, the User, performs machine and human functions in a sterile, functional environment warmed by low orange light reminiscent of a sunset or sunrise.

The final resting point for the code is in two sculptures: SPIN_LOCK and Heart in Heart.

<em>Wear</em>, 2004

Wear, 2004

Digital C-print
13.5 x 18.5 in / 34 x 46.7 cm 
44 x 34 in / 112 x 86 cm 
Edition of 6, 1 AP

"Cycles" is a photographic series of performed actions, as written in computer code (Linux Kernel). This machine language, a narrative of instructions based on English, is then transferred to organza ribbon. A single character, the User, performs machine and human functions in a sterile, functional environment warmed by low orange light reminiscent of a sunset or sunrise.

The final resting point for the code is in two sculptures: SPIN_LOCK and Heart in Heart.

<em>Love Letters From A World Of Awe</em> Flier, 1995

Love Letters From A World Of Awe Flier, 1995

The first flier in the East Village cafes to announce a URL to a net art work. Actually, the first flier to include a URL alone.  

<em>The Hole Of The Lost Treasure</em>, 1994

The Hole Of The Lost Treasure, 1994

Cardboard box, black velvet, small things

These two polaroids show interior and exterior shots of the sculpture The Hole of the Lost Treasure.

Polaroid Of <em>Love Letters From A World Of Awe</em> Flier, 1995

Polaroid Of Love Letters From A World Of Awe Flier, 1995

Polaroid
Unique

This polaroid was taken on the corner of 7th Street and Avenue A. The establishment across the street is long gone. The polaroid was scanned and introduced into the net art piece it promotes to create a feedback loop between the physical and virtual spaces.

<em>On The Twenty-Somethingth Mile</em>, 2005

On The Twenty-Somethingth Mile, 2005

Performance duration: 15 min
The Drawing Center for the "River to River" festival, NYC

Conceived and performed with performance artist Nao Bustamante. Music by Yoav Gal and a dancefilm by Evann Siebens. The program was organized by The Drawing Center for the "River to River" festival in downtown Manhattan, The program included two screenings by Shahzia Sikander and William Kentridge.

Wednesday, September 7, Screenings at 6:00 and 7:00 pm. The performance included two songs and two love letters: Pearl, Conception/Mis, and Portal from the World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal.

<em>Bit By Bit, Cell By Cell</em>, 2005

Bit By Bit, Cell By Cell, 2005

Enhanced Music CD, Innova Recordings

This enhance CD is a collaboration composer Yoav Gal and dance filmmaker Evann Siebens. Love letters and travelogs from the Traveler's Journal were set to music. Eleven music tracks alternate between a digitally manipulated soprano (Sarah Rivkin) and instrumental music composed for an Atari 800 XL. The CD is available on Amazon, iTunes, Innova recordings label, Eyebeam's bookstore and soon here.

<em>Love Letters Delivery Service</em>, 2001

Love Letters Delivery Service, 2001

WWW and email protocols

The intention was to take the Love Letters from the World of Awe: A Traveler's Journal Chapter 1: Forever and use the email protocol to disseminate them to (mostly) subscribers.

<em>Schedule_Task</em>, 2004

Schedule_Task, 2004

Video
2:31 Minutes
Edition of 6, 1 AP
Collection of CU Art Museum, University of Colorado at Boulder

This video artwork simulates a computer process called schedule task. The two screens alternate a simple action. On the left, the User wakes up from sleep mode and is ready for action, on the right, the User taps her knee while singing Ring of Fire by June Carter Cash. The video is a continuous loop.

<em>Love Letters From A World Of Awe</em> Performance, 1997

Love Letters From A World Of Awe Performance, 1997

One-person, multimedia performance, including love letters, slides, and song narrated by a single performer seated with her back to the audience.

The performance took place at the The American Living Room, an annual summer festival featuring new works by emerging artists held at HERE, NYC.

<em>Love Letters from a World of Awe</em>, 1995

Love Letters from a World of Awe, 1995

Website
http://worldofawe.net/woa95/index1.html

The first edition of the World of Awe website. The piece integrates paintings from that period and East Village stories. One of the earliest net artworks, this piece was an experiment on every level—creative, formal, and conceptual—that attempted to explore both the Internet and an Internet art work.

<em>Love Letters from a World of Awe</em>, 1997

Love Letters from a World of Awe, 1997

Website
http://www.thebluedot.com/worldofawe/

Second version of Love Letters from a World of Awewebsite, formerly hosted on RSUB Blue Dot, the Razorfish experimental culture division. 

<em>World Of Awe Mousepad</em>, 2000

World Of Awe Mousepad, 2000

 

This World of Awe mousepad was designed for Rhizome.org.

<em>Love Letters from a World of Awe</em> floppies, 1996

Love Letters from a World of Awe floppies, 1996

HTML files, jpgs and gifs on floppies
Mac, Netscape 3.0 + RealAudio player 
PC native web browser

+ + + 

Traveller's log 45/3
sunset/sunrise
"Do you know the sound of yellow?"

Beloved,

If I was to show the ways of love the only thing I could answer this day is: Suspension.

It is suspension (definition=suspense: The state or quality of being undecided or doubtful. Anxiety or apprehension resulting from an undecided, uncertain or mysterious situation).

It is very, very yellow and very bareboned. I can't tell where the horizon should cut through. I took refuge under a fat yellow cumulus. It's suspended ... and if it moves an inch — I move an inch. and if it moves half an inch — I move half an inch. It's very, very yellow here.

Can you feel the sound?
Can you touch the sound?
Do you know the sound of yellow?
It's suspended. It's slick. It's hot - very hot - very
yellow.

I saw an insect crawl under my foot. I'm suspended too. I don't like insects crawling under my foot. This means discomfort.

I wish north would show its face and get motion into cumulus. This suspension is heavy on the breathing, and my body is so big and needs so much air. Yellow suspension. I got to go got to run.

I will bury this letter deep into cumulus for when motion comes and will turn the colors around. When it turns cumulus into blue, it will drop on you. This blue on you always blows my breath away ... here in suspension. It's very, very yellow here, hear - do you know the sound of yellow? Hello? hear — do you know the sound of yellow? Hello? hear — do you know the sound of yellow? Hello?

Yours forever
your sunset/sunrise
4ever yours
yours 4ever yours

<em>Pfff</em>, 1994

Pfff, 1994

Acrylic on canvas
40 x 30 in / 101.6 x 76.2 cm

<em>Underwater</em>, 1995

Underwater, 1995

Acrylic, paper, rope, candy sprinkles, paper maché, marker on canvas
40 x 30 in / 101.6 x 76.2 cm

<em>Avalanche</em>, 1995

Avalanche, 1995

Acrylic, marker and glitter on canvas
40 x 30 in / 101.6 x 76.2 cm

<em>Bloody Piggy Doggy Pig</em>, 1995

Bloody Piggy Doggy Pig, 1995

Acrylic, hair, paper maché
40 x 30 in / 101.6 x 76.2 cm

 

<em>Concrete</em>, 1995

Concrete, 1995

Acrylic, adhesive wall paper, string, candy sprinkles, marker
30 x 20 inch

<em>Do You See?</em>, 1995

Do You See?, 1995

Acrylic, candy sprinkles on canvas
40 x 30 in / 101.6 x 76.2 cm

<em>Ear Pop</em>, 1995

Ear Pop, 1995

Acrylic, candy sprinkles, marker on canvas
30 x 20 inch

<em>Flight</em>, 1995

Flight, 1995

Acrylic, puffy stickers on canvas
30 x 20 inch

<em>Input/Output</em>, 1995

Input/Output, 1995

Acrylic, glitter and plastic fly on canvas
40 x 30 in / 101.6 x 76.2 cm

Text:

Beloved,

Falling from a cloud of unknowing, I have returned to normal speech where a sentence has a beginning, middle and end. At that moment I knew that some have spiritual talent and some don't. I don't. 

My dear, at last, the journey might be coming to an end, heaven is not to be found in these terrains.

Yours forever your sunset/ sunrise forever yours
Yours forever yours

<em>Kisses</em>, 1995

Kisses, 1995

Acrylic, sticker, marker, glitter on canvas
30 x 20 inch

<em>Nightmare</em>, 1995

Nightmare, 1995

Acrylic, candy sprinkles, marker, and string on canvas
30 x 20 inch

<em>The Point of No Return</em>, 1995

The Point of No Return, 1995

Acrylic on canvas
40 x 30 in / 101.6 x 76.1 cm

<em>Ready</em>, 1995

Ready, 1995

Acrylic, paper maché, string, candy sprinkles, puffy stickers
40 x 30 in / 101.6 x 76.2 cm

<em>Relief</em>, 1995

Relief, 1995

Acrylic, paper maché, string on canvas

<em>SingSing</em>, 1995

SingSing, 1995

Acrylic, candy sprinkles, marker, punch tape, glitter on canvas
30 x 20 inch

<em>One Thousand Slamming Doors</em>, 1995

One Thousand Slamming Doors, 1995

Acrylic, paper, marker on canvas
40 x 30 in / 101.6 x 76.2 cm

Text:

Love letter 2172/6
Sunset/Sunrise 

Beloved,

You would think that with all the scenes I have witnessed from a bird-eye’s view I would have built endurance. Alas, my dear friend, I am ashamed to admit that whenever we pass over a zone of One Thousand Slamming Doors I still shut my eye as hard as I can not to be hearing the spiteful sound of rejection.

Humbly your admirer,

Yours forever 
your sunset/sunrise forever yours
yours forever yours

<em>Hunger</em>, 1995

Hunger, 1995

Acrylic and marker on canvas
40 x 30 in / 101.6 x 76.2 cm