Jerusalem to Tel Aviv, 2010

Custom software, computer, video display
One year cycle
Screen dimensions variable
Edition of 6

Jerusalem to Tel Aviv uses footage shot from the window of a taxi van and synchronizes the clips to an annual clock. 

Calling the half, three-quarter and full hours, time in this looping visual experience is marked by audio recordings of church bells, dogs, and crows.

Jungle: Lopate vs. Bresnick, 2013

Custom software, computer, video display
One year cycle
Screen dimensions variable
Software designed by Yael Kanarek and Shawn Lawson

Jungle: Lopate vs. Bresnick, recounts a casual tennis match that took place in Italy between two of Kanarek's collegues, essayist Philip Lopate and composer Martin Bresnick. Structured to reflect current time, custom software controls the video playback, synchronizing a myriad of clips and sounds. At the fourth quarter of each hour, the voice of Werner Herzog describes the jungle of Fitzcarraldo as an unfinished part of creation. Marking the passing of minutes, days, months and years, Mighty Mouse (also known as the Mouse of Tomorrow) valiantly flies across the screen. Jeff Buckley’s opening breath from the song "Hallelujah" strikes on the top of each hour. 

The project was filmed in during an artists residency at the Civitella Ranieri in Umbria, Italy. 

Swing, 2011

Custom software, computer, video display
Infinite duration
Screen dimensions variable
Software designed by Yael Kanarek and Shawn Lawson

From the 16th Century until the 1930s, the most accurate time-keeping technology was the pendulum. Now obsolete, the pendulum is alluded to with the swinging gesture of a child named Yoav. For he and the other children, time is digital and about counting numbers. In Swing, they take upon themselves the role of timekeepers. At the 23rd minute of the hour, for example, his brother Nadav announces that Yoav has been swinging continuously for 23 minutes.

Every hour, the two brothers and their friends discuss the scarcity of water in Israel and the lack of peace with Syria. Aged between 6 and 8 years old, their simple conversations voice international concerns and national anxieties. Using sound as the primary marker of time, seconds are indicated by dripping water, as are the strikes at the top of an hour.

Explosion 1960, 2011

Custom software, computer, video display, sound, 24" screen, custom wood box
One year cycle
Software designed by Yael Kanarek and Shawn Lawson

Explosion 1960 employs the computer clock as a playback metronome. Over a year, as full revolution is completed. Each explosion on the screen is synchronized in a loop with with six temporal unit of measure: seconds, minutes, hours, days, months and years. The top of each hour is struck in repetition in the manner of traditional clocks. 

Appropriated footage in this piece comes from U.S. Atomic Energy Commission ducumentaion during Operation Dugout in 1960 showing the results of massive underground test explosions.

Heavenly, So Long!, 2011

Custom software, computer, video display
Infinite duration
Screen dimensions variable (minimum projection: 15 feet wide)
Software designed by Yael Kanarek and Shawn Lawson
Sound by Andrea Parkins
Commissioned by Flux Factory, Queens

Heavenly, So Long! was commissioned by Flux Factory for the exhibition The Typhoon Continues and So Do You. Artists were presented with five political viral media items and were asked to select one to react to. This piece emerged from a viral remix of a North Korean Army March.

Sound designed by Andrew Parker